Detecting Structural Breaks in China’s FX Regime

Edit: This post is in its infancy. Work is still ongoing as far as deriving insight from the data is concerned. More content and economic insight is expected to be added to this post as and when progress is made in that direction.

This is an attempt to detect structural breaks in China’s FX regime using Frenkel Wei regression methodology (this was later improved by Perron and Bai). I came up with the motivation to check for these structural breaks while attending a guest lecture on FX regimes by Dr. Ajay Shah delivered at IGIDR. This is work that I and two other classmates are working on as a term paper project under the supervision of Dr. Rajeswari Sengupta.

The code below can be replicated and run as is, to get same results.

As can be seen in the figure below, the structural breaks correspond to the vertical bars. We are still working on understanding the motivations of China’s central bank in varying the degree of the managed float exchange rate.

strucchange_china_2006_2010

EDIT (May 16, 2016):

The code above uses data provided by the package itself. If you wished to replicate this analysis on data after 2010, you will have to use your own data. We used Quandl, which lets you get 10 premium datasets for free. An API key (for only 10 calls on premium datasets) is provided if you register there. Foreign exchange rate data (2000 onward till date) apparently, is premium data. You can find these here.

Here are the (partial) results and code to work the same methodology on the data from 2010 to 2016:

20102016

We got breaks in 2010 and in 2015 (when China’s stock markets crashed). We would have hoped for more breaks (we can still get them), but that would depend on the parameters chosen for our regression.

 

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